kaymu
Category Tech
15 March 2016,
 Off
Was an iPhone the weapon used to kill people in Paris and San Bernardino or was it an assault weapon? It seems like it was an iPhone, although it wasn’t. Perhaps the government should be interested in modifying technology that directly causes a crime rather than technology that criminals incidentally use, such as phones or cars.
We can no longer trust the federal government to do the right thing with our trusted privacy – we all learned this from the revelations of Edward Snowden. At this point, the people of our country must stand their ground and fight the Obama Administration and everyone else who mean to use our phones as tools to spy on us. Apple now sees themselves as a threat to their own product and will soon distribute a smart phone that even they cannot hack. Good – at least there will be one place left in this world were we the people can still trust that we will not be invaded by a predatory government that has turned on its own people.
When Mr. Obama says “I’m confident this is something that we can solve” what he really means is “I don’t have a clue how to solve this.” Neither do I. But here are three things I do know:
1. Dear intelligence community: You reap what you sow. Maybe we would be more trusting if you hadn’t broken the law by conducting sweeping data collection of U.S. citizens and then lying to our faces about it.
2. The FBI’s conduct in every aspect of the San Bernadino case if rife with incompetence. If you’re dumb enough to lock yourself out of the phone by changing the password, you’re too stupid to be trusted with an encryption key. Not to mention that you would eventually find a way to use it to spy on civil rights leaders. Again.
3. Barack Obama claiming to be a fierce defender of civil rights is a knee slapper of epic proportions. I doubt that all the jailed journalists and whistle blowers find it as funny as I do, and it may not have the high comedy of his winning the Nobel Peace prize, but come on, it’s a howler.